Agenda

CONFERENCE AT A GLANCE

Monday, October 7, 2019
Day 1  
7:00 a.m. Vendor Set-Up
7:30 a.m. –8:30 a.m. Check-In / Registration & Coffee
8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. Welcome / Introductions
8:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Keynote Address / Q&A

Benjamin Sigel, Ph. D, Presentation:More than Playing Doctor: What We Know about and Should Do to Help Children with Problematic Sexual Behavior and Their Families!”

Morning Session
10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Samantha Walker, LMSW & Marla Jones,  Presentation: “Bridging the Gap Between Safety and Permanency” (CAC,MDT,MH)

Description:

Participants will be introduced to strategies to help facilitate safe, timely, and sustainable reunification.  Participants will also learn the importance of establishing clear conditions of return at the onset of CPS involvement and how building consensus early with families leads to better outcomes.

Shannon Martucci FBI, Presentation: Adolescent Dynamics” (FI, CAC, MDT)

Description:  

Adolescents can be a difficult population to interview do to their social, emotional and cognitive development.  This module will focus on educating the investigator about adolescent development and the challenges development presents in the investigative interview.  Complicity issues and how to overcome this barrier while conducting interviews will be addressed.

Melissa Brunner SRCAC, Presentation: “Interaction Styles – We win, Teams Win and Kids Win!” (CAC, MDT)

Description:

How do you tend to express yourself? How are you driven to interact with others? Your core Interaction Style is the most easily observed aspect of your CORE self since it is embodied in your communications and movements. The four styles are: In-Charge, Chart the Course, Behind the Scenes and Get Things Going. The InterStrength Interaction Styles lens helps us establish rapport and greatly affects relationships within our organizations and on our teams. This workshop will give you the ability to bring to light everyday differences that are at the root of much of the conflict we experience in interaction with others. Yet, we will learn about the richness and variety in the ways we have of expressing who we are. If we can recognize our own style, we can better match our energy and know how to adapt and flex when necessary to reach goals and meet others at their view of the world.

Lunch
12:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. Networking Lunch  & Exhibits
Afternoon Session 1
1:15 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Tamara Glover, MA, Presentation: “Considering the Evolution of Technology within the Forensic Interview” (FI, CAC, MDT)

Description:

Technology is evolving everyday! As such, knowledge, awareness, and prevention related to technology threats must also evolve.  By acknowledging technology as an area of possible concern, assessment and exploration should take place in efforts to keep our children safe. Similar to the historical safety message of “stranger danger”; as the world progresses, so must our methods for safety in the capacity of technology. Considering the unlimited and immediate access offered by a variety of devices and mediums; opportunities such as a forensic interview can be used to explore these other potential threats and concerns.  As such, let’s continue to progress within the forensic interview and come together multi-disciplinary team to start a conversation involving images and social media and expanding far beyond.

Staci Whitney, Presentation: “Child Victims with Disabilities” (CAC, MDT, MH)

Description:

While child abuse, neglect, exploitation and sexual assault can affect any child, children with disabilities are at greater risk of abuse and neglect than children without disabilities.  Children with disabilities experience victimization of violent crimes at greater rates than those without disabilities.  In 2015, the average annual rate of violent victimization for children with disabilities was more than triple the rate among children without disabilities.  Serious violent victimization for children with disabilities was more than three times than that for children without disabilities (Harrell, 2017).  The risk of being a victim of crime, especially a victim of sexual assault, is 4 to 10 times higher for a child with a disability.  Across all disability groups, children with intellectual disabilities have the highest rate of victimization. Understanding and communicating effectively with children with disabilities including intellectual disabilities, physical and communication disabilities who are victims of abuse are necessary skills for child protective services, law enforcement, forensic interviewers, social service personnel and other child welfare staff.  The ability to understand the unique characteristics and communicate effectively is paramount in creating safe environments and conducting appropriate investigations. The participants in this training will develop a broader understanding of children with disabilities as well as new strategies for effective interviewing and communicating.  Video clips of real individuals with disabilities are integrated into the presentation to maximize the effectiveness of the training.

Chuck Boring, J.D., Presentation: “The One in the Arena: Testifying as Lay and Expert Witnesses” (PROS, MDT)

Description:

This presentation will provide attendees with tools and advice for properly preparing to testify as a fact witness in child abuse cases.  Attendees will also learn skills for testifying as an expert witness in child abuse cases, and how to proactively assist the State in quelling defense cross-examination techniques.

Break

2:45 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Afternoon Session 2
3:00 p.m. –  4:30 p.m. Andrew Agatston, J.D., Presentation: “Georgia statutes, legal rules and procedures that Georgia CACs should know to respond effectively in court.” (CAC, PROS)

Description:

When the General Assembly enacted 2017 legislation setting forth protections in the release of forensic interview materials, it provided Georgia CACs with an unprecedented manner in which to respond to demands for these highly sensitive and confidential materials.  However, there are a myriad of Georgia statutes, rules and procedures that Georgia CACs should know when it is involved in criminal and civil cases as third parties, and this workshop will discuss these important legal rules and procedures, while helping to build a legal CAC toolkit for the future.

Rebecca Ferguson, LMFT, Presentation: “Self Care for Badasses” (MH, MDT)

Description:

Helping professionals are frequently expected to spend more time on self-care while simultaneously inundated with more work to do and less time in which to do it.  This is especially true in fields in which professionals are working emotionally draining and potentially traumatizing cases. This training will explore the mental shifts and cognitive work to decrease burnout with little or  no additional time expended. Frameworks and practical exercises will be provided to allow each of us to continue in the field as the emotionally healthy badasses that our clients and families deserve.

Ted Buckenham, MA, LPC, CPCS, Presentation: “The Joy of Collaborate Reporting” (CAC,MDT)

Description:

Participants will learn how to create reports in Collaborate by adding the necessary fields, setting default values where needed, and saving the report for later use. Participants will learn: (1) the concepts of selecting fields to be included in the report, (2) how to set and apply default filters in the report, (3) how to run the report and manipulate filters to produce the specific data they need, (4) how to export data to spreadsheet applications when needed.

Tuesday, October 8, 2019
Day 2
8:00 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. Registration & Coffee
8:45 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Welcome & Introductions
Plenary

9:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m.

(Morning Plenary, ALL) Francey Hakes, J.D., Presentation: “How Hollywood Helps Victims”
Break

10:20 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Morning Session
10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Stacey Kreitz, MSW, Presentation: “Presenting Evidence in a Forensic Interview: Homeland Security Investigation’s Prepare and Predict” (FI, MDT)

Description:

Homeland Security Investigation’s Prepare and Predict Guidelines (PPG) will equip established forensic interviewers with the tools necessary to utilize evidence presentation in investigations involving child sexual abuse, child pornography, sextortion, enticement and human trafficking. PPG instructs forensic interviewers on working with law enforcement officers with selecting and preparing evidence for use in a forensic interview. In addition, Prepare and Predict Guidelines utilizes a hypothesis-testing framework that minimizes trauma, maximizes information obtained, and minimizes contamination of memory while maintaining the integrity of the investigative process.

Liza Murray, MD, Presentation: “It’s Just a Little Bruise: Recognition and Evaluation of Sentinel Injuries” (MED, MDT)

Description:

Through case-based learning and utilization of a novel smartphone tool, participants will learn the importance of recognizing “small” sentinel injuries which could be a sign of physical abuse. We will review which relatively minor injuries should alert an individual to the possibility of abuse and highlight the necessity of a medical workup to evaluate for underlying injuries. This workshop will include interactive learning with the free smartphone app “Child Protector” which can be downloaded prior to attending.

Cory Jewell Jensen, M.S., CCSOT, Presentation: “What Sex Offenders Can Teach Us About Interviewing Part 1” (LE, MDT)

Description:

One hundred and twelve adult male sex offenders and 26 child abuse detectives were questioned about a variety of topics related to suspect interview strategies and offender decisions to deny, admit or fully confess. Results suggest that personality style and previous experience play a role in confession rates for offenders and that investigator personality and interview style are also crucial. The presentation will:

  • Compare confession rates for criminal investigations with generic criminals versus sex offenders/child molesters.
  • Review research studies that focused on “what works” with sex offenders.
  • Anecdotal comments from sex offenders who confessed and sex offenders who did not confess about the police interview they experienced.
  • Advice and interview strategies used by experienced child abuse detectives with high confession rates.

Video of suspect interview.

12:00 p.m. Lunch
Afternoon Session
1:15p.m.-2:45p.m. David Okech, MSW, Ph. D, Presentation: “Financial Capability and Human Trafficking” (MDT, CAC)

Description:

The presentation will discuss Dr. Okech’s research on human trafficking – the exploitation of men, women, and children for the purposes of labor and sex. He will also share his focuses on designing evidence-based interventions and policies to inform programs and policies that will improve psycho-social and physical health, increase economic empowerment and put survivors on a path to recovery, stability and social integration.

Jeff Ashby, Ph. D, Presentation: “Professional Ethics: Guidelines for Multidisciplinary Teams (MH, MDT, CAC)

Description:

We are all obligated to engage in ethical practice.  However, working in multidisciplinary teams presents unique ethical challenges.  Using case examples, discussion, and lecture, participants in this workshop will consider how the ethical codes apply to the practical world of multidisciplinary teams. The workshop will highlight issues of informed consent, confidentiality, and boundaries/multiple relationships.  Using case studies and vignettes, professionals will be invited to consider what might be the best course of action in a variety of scenarios presenting ethical dilemmas.

Cory Jewell Jensen, M.S., CCSOT, Presentation: “What Sex Offenders Can Teach Us About Interviewing Part 2” (LE, MDT)

Description:

One hundred and twelve adult male sex offenders and 26 child abuse detectives were questioned about a variety of topics related to suspect interview strategies and offender decisions to deny, admit or fully confess. Results suggest that personality style and previous experience play a role in confession rates for offenders and that investigator personality and interview style are also crucial. The presentation will:

  • Compare confession rates for criminal investigations with generic criminals versus sex offenders/child molesters.
  • Review research studies that focused on “what works” with sex offenders.
  • Anecdotal comments from sex offenders who confessed and sex offenders who did not confess about the police interview they experienced.
  • Advice and interview strategies used by experienced child abuse detectives with high confession rates.

Video of suspect interview.

2:45-2:55 Break
3:00-4:30 Curt Holmes, Ph. D, Mental Health Peer Review: “Treatment Issues in Treating Problematic Sexual Behavior (PSB) in Children” (MH)

Description:

4 Learning Objectives:

  1. Approximately 35 % of children who are sexually abused have perpetrators who are also minors.
  2. Eliminate some inaccurate myths about kids with PSB
  3. Become familiar with 4 evidence-based treatment models for treating PSB including:
    1. TF-CBT
    2. PCIT
    3. MST-PSB
    4. PSB-CBT
  4. Identify the 4 background factors most often seen in PSB kids
    1. Modeling of sexuality
    2. Modeling of coercion
    3. Family adversity
    4. Child vulnerabilities

Tamika Bryant, MD, Presentation: “Munch Much? : What to know about Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy” (MED, MDT)

Description:

This presentation will:

  • Define and provide some background on the diagnosis of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy
  • Discuss alternate terminology that may be used for the diagnosis
  • Discuss some of the challenges of evaluating and investigating these types of cases
  • Provide some practical tips and tools that may assist in evaluating and investigating these cases.

Mary Beth Nelson, LCSW, Forensic Interview Peer Review (FI, CAC)

Description:

Peer review meeting focusing on using your “less-than-perfect interview” and how to prepare for court.  Reviewing potential errors in the interview, determining the severity of the error and then how to address the error(s) in court testimony.

4:30 Conference Adjournment